Add Advertisement

Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Previous
Profile
Next
Profile

Navy Littoral Combat Ship (LCS)/Frigate Program: Background and Issues for Congress

04/05/2016

The Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship (LCS)/Frigate program is a program to procure a large number of LCSs and modified LCSs. The modified LCSs are to be referred to as frigates. 

The LCS program has been controversial over the years due to past cost growth, design and construction issues with the lead ships built to each design, concerns over the ships’ survivability (i.e., ability to withstand battle damage), concerns over whether the ships are sufficiently armed and would be able to perform their stated missions effectively, and concerns over the development and testing of the ships’ modular mission packages. The Navy’s execution of the program has been a matter of congressional oversight attention for several years. 

Prior to December 14, 2015, Navy plans called for procuring a total of 32 LCSs and 20 frigates, for a total of 52 ships. A December 14, 2015, memorandum from Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter to Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus directed the Navy to reduce the LCS/Frigate program to a total of 40 ships. The memorandum also directed the Navy to reduce planned annual procurement quantities of LCSs during the Navy’s FY2017-FY2021 five-year shipbuilding plan, and to neck down to a single design variant of the ships starting with the ships to be procured in FY2019. (Two different variants of the LCS are currently built by two shipyards.) 

The first LCS was funded in FY2005, and a total of 26 have been funded through FY2016. The Navy’s proposed FY2017 budget requests $1,125.6 million for the procurement of the 27th and 28th LCSs, or an average of $562.8 million for each ship. The Navy’s proposed FY2017 budget also requests $86 million in so-called “cost-to-complete” procurement funding to cover cost growth on LCSs procured in previous fiscal years, and $139.4 million for procurement of LCS mission module equipment. 

Two very different baseline LCS designs are currently being built. One was developed by an industry team led by Lockheed; the other was developed by an industry team that was led by General Dynamics. The Lockheed design is built at the Marinette Marine shipyard at Marinette, WI; the General Dynamics design is built at the Austal USA shipyard at Mobile, AL. 

Ships 5 through 26 in the program are being procured under a pair of block buy contracts that were awarded to the two LCS builders in December 2010. The 24th LCS—the first of the three LCSs requested for procurement in FY2016—was to be the final ship to be procured under these block buy contracts, but contracts were extended to include the 25th and 26th ships (i.e., the second and third ships requested for FY2016) as well. 

The LCS program poses several issues for Congress, including whether to approve, reject, or modify the Navy’s FY2017 funding requests for the program, and whether to approve, reject, or modify the Secretary of Defense’s December 2015 direction to the Navy to reduce the program from 52 ships to 40, and to neck down to a single design variant starting with the ships to be procured in FY2019.

 

 

Read Full Story

 

 

(Source: Congressional Research Service; issued 05.04.2016)

Date: 
04/05/2016
Companies & Organizations: General Dynamics Corp | Lockheed Martin Corporation
Defense Products & Services Sectors: 

Publish News & Press-Releases, Company Profile, Products and Services on ARMSCOM.net. Email to armscom.net@gmail.com.